Hair colour is genetic; however, this doesn’t mean a person’s hair will stay the same colour all her life. Sun damage, nutritional deficiencies, changes in a person’s haircare routine and even disease can alter hair colour.

Why Hair Changes Colour With Age

Follicles at the base of the hair shaft produce melanin, the same chemical that causes skin pigmentation. Depending on the amount of melanin produced, hair appears in a wide spectrum of colours from black to platinum blonde.

As the body ages these follicles slow down and eventually stop production. The hair now produced is colourless; when colourless hairs and coloured hairs are seen together the hair may appear grey, but if and when all hair follicles stop producing pigment, the hair will appear white.

Follicles may not simply stop producing melanin neatly; they may stop and start for a while, producing hairs which change colour along the length. It is common for hair to appear less bright before it turns grey, leading people to believe it has “faded”.

Changes in Hair Health and Natural Hair Care Ingredients

People who discover natural hair care sometimes find their hair changes colour slightly once it has reached optimum condition. Indian herbs are often marketed as “darkening”, which does not mean they colour brown or blonde hair; rather, it means they improve the condition of black hair so it appears a shiny, glossy black rather than dull greyish or brownish tones.

Other herbal or natural ingredients can subtly deposit colour, even leaving aside herbs used specifically for colouring purposes such as henna. Some people report that using diluted apple cider vinegar rinses eventually leaves reddish traces on hair. Chamomile adds golden tones to very light hair.

The vivid, orange-red dye produced by the henna bush is safer and more permanent than regular hair dyes. Henna is the subject of many myths and misconceptions, however.
It can sometimes be difficult to tell if a treatment is depositing colour or simply allowing hair to achieve its healthiest colour.

Sun Damage and Hair

It’s no secret that hair gets lightened by the sun, and many people with brown and blonde hair naturally turn a few shades lighter in summer. Hairdressers promote this trend by recommending women go for cooler, darker lowlights in winter and blonde highlights in summer. Once bleached by the sun, hair doesn’t actually turn dark again; it is simply trimmed off and replaced by darker roots. People with very long hair often have lighter ends than roots due to accumulated sun damage. Using the sun to lighten hair is not recommended, as it damages hair and increases the risk of skin cancer.

Can Hair Turn Redder or Less Red?

Every shade of hair colour has some red in it, whether visible or not. This is caused by the chemical pheomelanin, which works with eumelanin to create red, brown, black or blonde hair. While pure red hair is relatively uncommon, it is possible for hair to appear more or less red throughout a person’s lifetime. Many young Caucasian children have strawberry blonde hair that later becomes “dirty blonde” or light brown.

Health Conditions and Changes in Hair Colour

People suffering from malnutrition sometimes notice their hair becoming lighter as well as weaker and more slow-growing. Hair lightening caused by malnutrition reverses once adequate nutrition is introduced.

A number of other medical conditions, including vitiligo, pernicious anaemia and Werner syndrome (a disease characterised by rapid aging in adults) can result in hair changing colour or greying. Prematurely greying hair is usually genetic and benign.

To further confuse matters, further, hair often slowly changes colour between infancy and adulthood “just because”. Genetics is probably the answer, although it is not clear exactly why a blonde baby gradually turns to a dark-haired adult. If your family members’ red hair gradually changed to brown by the time they were 30, chances are yours will too. Hair can also change texture several times over a lifetime.

http://www.dailynewsz.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Why-Does-Hair-Change-Colour-Over-a-Lifetime.jpghttp://www.dailynewsz.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Why-Does-Hair-Change-Colour-Over-a-Lifetime-300x300.jpgAdminSciencehair,hair color
Hair colour is genetic; however, this doesn’t mean a person’s hair will stay the same colour all her life. Sun damage, nutritional deficiencies, changes in a person’s haircare routine and even disease can alter hair colour. Why Hair Changes Colour With Age Follicles at the base of the hair shaft produce...