In a new study researchers have found the food for some of our ancient human relatives was woolly rhinoceroses and wild sheep while others feasted on ascetic diet of mushrooms and moss.

Hardened plaque has been found on the teeth of five Neanderthal specimens which were uncovered earlier in Belgium and Spain.

Details have been published in the Nature journal and it writes our long-extinct relatives were a lot like us, even in much more ways that we had initially imagined.

The study writes evidence has also been found they had used medicine to heal their aches and pains.

Neanderthals became extinct about 40,000 years ago and for decades researchers have been trying to uncover as much possible about their lifestyle. Until now such a closer look was not understood about what they ate.

One of the leading authors of the study, Keith Dobney, said they have found bits and pieces of animal hair, pollen grains and other things trapped.

Dobney is the head of the department of human paleoecology at the University of Liverpool in London.

From the genetic evidence from the teeth the researchers have found Belgian Neanderthals ate woolly rhinos, wild sheep and mushrooms while the Spanish Neanderthals indulged in mushrooms, pine nuts and forest moss.

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In a new study researchers have found the food for some of our ancient human relatives was woolly rhinoceroses and wild sheep while others feasted on ascetic diet of mushrooms and moss. Hardened plaque has been found on the teeth of five Neanderthal specimens which were uncovered earlier in Belgium...