Ivory Coast President Alassane Ouattara said Saturday the two-day army mutiny will end as negotiation with disgruntled soldiers has been delegated by the defense minister in the second-largest city Bouake.

The president nodded to be taking into account the demands of soldiers for increased salaries, working conditions and improved living standards.

However, Ouattara also criticized the mutineers’ tactics on Thursday night that resulted with troops shooting their weapons starting Friday morning.

He added, “I want to say that this manner of demanding is not appropriate. In fact, it tarnishes the image of our country after all of our efforts at economic development and diplomatic repositioning.”

The world’s top cocoa producer as well as Africa’s fastest-growing economy suffered political crisis between 2003 and 2011 that claimed over 3,000 lives. The more than a decade of turmoil was triggered by former President Laurent Gbagbo’s refusal to step down after electoral defeat.

Quattara faced many challenges in shaping an unified army. A similar revolt was staged by soldiers in 2014 and the government offered payoffs to defuse the crisis. Same is predicted to take place to end current crisis.

Meanwhile, West Africa analyst for the International Crisis Group, Cynthia Ohayon, said the fresh crisis reminds the longstanding issues are still unresolved.

United States and France have advised their citizens in Ivory Coast to remain alert and avoid keeping out of homes or office.

http://www.dailynewsz.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Ivory-Coast-President-Alassane-Ouattara-Agrees-Armys-Salary-Hikes.jpghttp://www.dailynewsz.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Ivory-Coast-President-Alassane-Ouattara-Agrees-Armys-Salary-Hikes-300x300.jpgAdminworld newsAlassane Ouattara Agrees,Ivory Coast
Ivory Coast President Alassane Ouattara said Saturday the two-day army mutiny will end as negotiation with disgruntled soldiers has been delegated by the defense minister in the second-largest city Bouake. The president nodded to be taking into account the demands of soldiers for increased salaries, working conditions and improved living...