After a survey that lasted over five days, a team consisting of researchers and marine archeologists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has finally come across wreckage of four historical ships in total. The four ships discovered include a clipper ship identified as the Noonday from the year 1863, the SS Selja from the year 1910 and two more ships that still remain unidentified. As it turned out, the team set out with the purpose of documenting the sunken historical ships. The search area was believed to be one of the most important harbors in America back in the old days.

The same thing has also been pointed out by James Delgado, a director that works for the National Marine Sanctuaries Office, the Maritime Heritage division. According to Delgado, the area searched by the team mentioned earlier was in fact the busiest harbor on the Pacific Coast back in those days. Delgado also points out that the fate of the historical ships from the past can also be predicted by taking a look at the wrecks that have been discovered at the Gulf of the Farallones. As a matter of fact, according to Delgado, the wrecks here may well represent what may have happened all these years, starting from the year 1595 to the present time. One good example is the wreck of the Puerto Rican tanker ship. This ship is believed to have sunk in the waters of San Francisco due to an explosion back in the year 1984.

 

As reported by the Live Science, the team of researchers and archeologists had to make use of a remotely operated vehicle, or the ROV for short, in order to help the people involved in the search make proper assessment in respect to the eight spots which sent out intriguing signals to the sonar used by the team. Out of those eight spots, four of them turned out to be the graveyard of historical ships.

 

The SS Selja, one of the ships discovered by the team, happened to be a steam freighter workhorse tasked to carry goods to and from Japan, China and the Pacific Northwest as well. Unfortunately, on November 22, 1910, the ship, which measured 116 meters long, could not avoid collision with another steam ship, called the Beaver, and then sank at the waters of the Point Reyes, California, US. Olaf Lie, the master of the Selja workhorse ship, tried to file a lawsuit against the Beaver for his loss. However, at that time, according to the maritime court that handled the case, it was the Selja that was cruising at a high speed in spite of a thick fog and hence, the SS Selja was held liable for the losses.

 

Yet, as in the case of the clipper ship Noonday, the signal was found by a volunteer that reanalyzed the sonar data from the NOAA. Back in the days, Noonday was responsible for bringing supplies and men to California both after and during the very famous Gold Rush, which had cost a lot of people their lives. This ship met its tragic fate back in the year 1863, when it hit a rock just before it reached the harbor of San Francisco. The unfortunate event took place on New Year’s Day. It was very tragic indeed, considering the ship had just completed its journey lasting 139 days in total. Unfortunately, after hitting the rock, there was no way for the ship to survive and make it to the harbor, despite the fact that it was actually not so far away from the harbor anymore.

 

The waters under the Golden Gate Bridge of San Francisco seem to have a lot of mysteries left for marine researchers and archeologists alike to discover. An enormous number of ships that dated back to the historical era were buried under the waters there. As a matter of fact, it is estimated that no less than 300 ships have been wrecked here. Yet, until now, researchers can only find a fraction of those wrecked ships.

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After a survey that lasted over five days, a team consisting of researchers and marine archeologists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has finally come across wreckage of four historical ships in total. The four ships discovered include a clipper ship identified as the Noonday from the...